About Bodaishin

Bodaishin is a newsletter dedicated to merging Zen Buddhism with everyday life and issues. There is a phrase, Hotsu Bodaishin, which means “Arousing the aspiration for enlightenment.” Dogen Zenji, the founder of the Sōtō Zen school, also defines this as “To arouse the mind which vows to save all beings before saving oneself.” That is the spirit of Bodaishin.

Bodaishin will cover topics such as:

  • Zen Practice

  • Cultural Issues

  • Personal Experiences

  • Relevant News Through a Buddhist Lens

In time, Bodaishin may expand into less-heavy topics such as:

  • Buddhist (and non!) Movie Reviews

  • Buddhist Arts and Music

  • Guest Contributions

To subscribe to Bodaishin right now, click below:


What About Paid Subscriptions?

After thought, reflection, and talking with others—Bodaishin will keep all of its content free of charge, with no paywall, for the foreseeable future. That said, there are options for paid subscriptions when subscribing to Bodaishin. These are set to the lowest allowable prices: $5/monthly and $50/annually.

The monthly and annual tiers only add the ability to comment on posts. Any paid subscriber is greatly appreciated; however, Bodaishin aims to be as accessible by as many people as possible—with and without means. A one-time donation link will also be added to posts and subsequent e-mails if anyone would like to show gratitude with a cup of coffee or tea.


About Koushi

Koushi is a lay Sōtō Zen practitioner with over two-decades of religious study and practice spanning Judeo-Christian, Islam, Pagan, and Eastern religions. A lifelong student of religion and cultural beliefs, Koushi is adept at finding common threads among places, people, belief-systems, and everyday life. Koushi has been called a “Rockstar of Zen,” which he attributes to being heavily tattooed more so than his understanding of Zen.

Koushi practices with the Treeleaf sangha, which is a fully-online Sōtō Zen sangha established in 2006 by Jundo Cohen. Treeleaf Zendo is an online practice place for Zen practitioners who cannot easily commute to a Zen Center due to health concerns, living in remote areas, or childcare, work and family needs, and seeks to provide Zazen sittings, retreats, discussion, interaction with a teacher, and all other activities of a Sōtō Zen Buddhist Sangha.

Note: As Koushi is a lay Zen practitioner and not an ordained priest, anything said referencing Zen/Buddhism should be taken with a grain of salt. Although writing from an experiential and learned point of view, some scholarly meanings may be incorrect (if so, it will be corrected and updated when brought to attention).

You can read Koushi’s long-form biography by clicking here.

Koushi Sherrill sitting zazen, August 2021